Murray Darling Water Targets For Waterbirds
The Murrumbidgee

The Murrumbidgee

Murray-Darling water targets bring boom time for waterbirds in the Gayini wetlands

The Murrumbidgee’s Gayini wetlands are capturing much attention as a result of a massive bird breeding event that’s been supported by water set aside for environmental purposes. Tens of thousands of breeding waterbirds are thriving in the culturally important region, including the endangered Australasian bittern. Straw Necked IbisThis breeding event is the result of the collaborative effort between UNSW Centre for Ecosystem Science and Charles Sturt researchers, state and federal environmental water managers, and traditional owners. According to researchers, it’s one of the largest colonial waterbird breeding events this year. Gayini is an extensive wetland complex in south-west NSW, between Maude and Balranald and holds significant state, national and international conservation significance. It is the largest remaining area of wetlands in the Murrumbidgee Valley, in the southern Murray–Darling Basin and provides feeding and breeding habitat for many different species of freshwater birds. Read the story in full here: https://newsroom.unsw.edu.au/murray-darling-water-targets-bring-boom-time-waterbirds-gayini-wetlands

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The Wiradjuri people - The Murrumbidgee

The Wiradjuri people

The Wiradjuri people have lived in the Murrumbidgee area for tens of thousands of years. Among the first Europeans to reach the Murrumbidgee area was

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